Tag Archives: photojournalism

On the road in Parts Unknown

Its no big secret that editorial photography and photojournalism in general has taken a big hit over the past few years. There are very few outlets that actually pay or commission this work any more and it is now not more than a hobby for individuals who can afford to do it and have some vision or sence of adventure. This is why getting to work on Anthony Bourdain’s, Parts Unknown in 2018 was not only a great honour but a nice change of pace photographically for me as I return, briefly, to my “old life” …on the road with a couple of cameras.

The death of Bourdain not long after the Newfoundland segment of the TV show and the web stories launched only made it more poignant for me. He was a big person with a big heart who loved travel and telling stories. Food was the vector. Something all humans have in common regardless of all our other differences. The TV/video shows are great but the Parts Unknown Website and its companion site, Roads and Kingdoms are an expansion of the TV series and a testament to his dedication for journalism …get out their on the road.

In fact, Roads and Kingdoms may well be the best or travel/adventure journalism out their now. Do yourself a favour and go visit.

Visit Bourdain’s Newfoundland.

…or click on the images to see the stories I worked on for the segment.

 

 

A Class Act….

Happy to see this book finally on the shelves. With A Class Act. An Illustrated History of The Labour Movement in Newfoundland and Labrador, Journalist, Bill Gillispie revisits the history of Newfoundland’s strong labour movement and its evolution from fish and forestry workers to the modern oil industry and white collar government workers. Gillespie and I spent much time digging though my photo archive from the 80s and 90s of news events and my work with workers in Newfoundland and Labrador since 1979. This book is available through Boulder Publications.

Returning to rural Newfoundland

FAO-WWF-Canada_BaydeVerde-NL_GREGLOCKE-1647Fishermen look for cod fish in the waters near Port de Grave, Conception Bay, Newfoundland. 
© 2015 Greg Locke

Its was nice to return to some old school documentary photography work this summer. I spent a lot of time travelling around Newfoundland, revisiting many of the places I visited as a photojournalist many years ago resulting in the book with Michael Crummey, NEWFOUNDLAND …journey into a lost nation.

Once again, travelling light with two cameras, two lenses and no lights, looking for those little flashes of humanity that tell the stories of a culture and society.

I was surprised and happy to see that the old ways are still out there despite the destroyed fishery, the exodus of people for rural Newfoundland and the “Disneyfication” of culture that comes with an influx of tourism. Sadly, there are so few public outlets for this type of work anymore. The demise of the big news, current affairs and geographical magazines and newspapers mean these stories go untold. Thankfully there are a few dedicated online publication who do still produce good journalism and current affairs. One of those is Facts & Opinions.  This story of rural Newfoundland and more photos can be found on their website. Do check out the story, Life Goes on in Rural Newfoundland.

Launch of Facts & Opinions website

GULU, UGANDA. 09DEC04: –HUMANITARIAN CRISIS NORTH UGANDA — Musicians and dancers rehearse for a visit by Ugandan President, Yoweri Museveni to their refugee village of Awere in northern Uganda. 1.6 Million people have been displaced from their homes and farms in the provinces of northern Uganda and relocated to “protected villages” since 1996 due to the conflict between the Uganda governments UPDF army and The Lord’s Resistance Army. An extremist Christian rebel group led by Joseph Kony who gets arms and supplies from the fundamentalist Muslim government in Sudan. Photo by Greg Locke © 2004. (041209-097GSL.jpg)

 

For a long time I have lacked an outlet for my editorial photography and documentary work. With the collapse of news magazines, newspapers and just about every other consumer publication, clients and budgets disappeared. Quality journalism cost money to produce and few are willing to pay  in the media business these days.

Well, I’m happy to say that I am a part of a new journalism website that is being launched tonight. It’s original, insightful, quality journalism by experienced and professional journalists, editors and producers from around the world. It will be a subscriber access and pay-per-view on October 1. Until then, it’s free for you to have a look around to see if you like it.

If journalism is to survive it has to be created and purchased as a valuable product by people who care and understand the role of journalism and reporting in our society. The “retail media” business model of using journalism in a bait and switch shell game to sell your eyeballs to advertisers is over. It failed. Welcome to the new journalism.

If you have read this far, Thank You! and if you like good journalism please check out Facts & Opinions.com